WORKING MINDSET

By Anonymous, Staff Writer

Even though I’ve only been in high school for a few months, I’ve gone through a transformation from who I was in middle school. In seventh grade, I thought that I did in school didn’t really matter. I didn’t do much of my work and barely got anything done, which of course resulted in getting low grades. For some reason I didn’t feel the need or motivation to do anything. I  knew I was capable to work, but I chose not to, and even while I knew it was bad, I still didn’t. I also started making excuses for my poor grades. I blamed the teacher for assigning work that seemed pointless and used that as a reason for why I shouldn’t complete my assignments. This mindset carried into my 8th year, as sometimes I believed that my responsibilities to my work didn’t even matter since I was the top of the school. I was never really aware of the responsibilities I had, 8th grade seemed easy for the first half.

But as work got harder and more assignments and projects were added I started thinking more – about my future, about myself as a student. My friends were deciding what high schools they wanted to go while I hadn’t even thought about it. I knew high school was going to be harder, the work would be much different and I wouldn’t be able to succeed if I continued to make excuses for why I didn’t complete my work. As the end of the year came along and I was going to graduate. It was scary to think about, but it made me realized was going to have to take more responsibility. Graduating to high school, I wanted to be better, I had to work not harder, but better. 

I started high school with a new mindset. I felt ambitious and capable of doing the work. I thought I could get anything done, especially on time. Even though my previous thoughts of laziness still lingered, I wanted to be better at everything because I felt guilty from my past. I knew then that I could have tried but I didn’t, and that it only affected me. I wanted to make this year better because I wanted to break out of a cycle of procrastination.

Something else I tried to do in order to make sure I was successful in high school was to make an effort of reaching out and asking people for help when I didn’t understand. I decided to make friends, friends that I could count on. They helped me not only understand the work but also encouraged me to do my work, which made me feel better. Having friends support me made things a lot easier by knowing you have people with you to help. Most of the time I’d also study or finish projects with friends even if they didn’t have the exact same class. I didn’t feel as alone or incapable, some things I didn’t exactly have during middle school.

A word of advice I want to give to those students who aren’t really trying; everyone is responsible for his/her own actions. After everything is said and done, It will be easy to put the blame on someone or something else, but in the end your actions affect you.

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